Deciding Between In-House Recruiting and Hiring an Agency Recruiter

05-29-14 by Kristian Bright. 0 comments

Kristian Bright is our Recruiter at Stack Exchange London

London Working

In today’s market, the recruitment landscape is shifting as companies develop their talent acquisition strategy and look to formulate a more cost-effective recruitment process. As such, the role of the agency recruiter is changing and those in this field have to develop their offerings to stand out from the crowd. From an in-house recruiter perspective, there are three questions consider when dealing with agency recruiters:

  1. Are there benefits of using contingency recruiters?

    Firstly, the purpose of this blog is not to state that agency recruiters are the root of all evil. Quite the opposite, agency recruiters have a key role in delivering on recruitment hiring plans and present a number of benefits. Veteran agency recruiters offer experience, market knowledge, and access to vast networks within a given sector.

  2. When and where they should be used?

    As the recruitment landscape has shifted, so has the role of the agency recruiter. The role of the in-house recruiter has increased to incorporate not only managing the interview process, offers, and onboarding, but also playing a deeper role in developing and implementing sourcing strategies. As a result, agencies are now being used for specific “hard to fill” vacancies or when there is an urgent requirement and time to hire is short.

  3. What to be wary of?

    “Hello, can I speak to the person in charge of recruitment for your organisation?”…This is a call that all in-house recruiters have taken (almost daily, in some cases) from agency recruiters trying to win business. When it literally takes 30 seconds to find the relevant recruiter on social media platforms, it shows a real lack of research from the agency and, for me, does not suggest that this is someone that I would want to assist with recruitment.

    In-house recruiters should be wary of the contingent recruiters who are simply trying to do a quick deal or are just interested in meeting their billing targets. If you ask a recruiter to assist on a particular vacancy and they send you a raft of CVs for positions you have not asked them to work on, they probably are not somebody you would want to do business with.

    The agencies worth building a relationship with are those who take the time to listen to your hiring requirements and work to your timelines and guidelines. They will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of your organization and brand, which will result in the ability to represent it effectively when sourcing candidates.

In summary, agency recruiters will continue to play a part in traditional recruiting, whether on their own or in partnering with in-house teams. If your team is considering using an agency recruiter, do your homework. Make sure they are someone you not only want to do business with, but also someone you can trust in representing your company. To this extent, you may also want to consider how your agency recruiter is reaching out to candidates. On Careers 2.0, we require all job listings and candidate messages to include the exact company they are recruiting for, regardless of who is performing the hiring. These requirements not only protect the integrity and trust among candidates, but also provides for a better hiring experience. After all, a candidate’s interaction with the recruiter could be their first impression of your organization, which you want to be positive, regardless of whether or not you want to hire them.


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